All posts tagged “powershell

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Forward Windows event log entries to syslog server

Syslog is the defacto standard for sending log messages in an IP network. Instead of pulling log messages from a remote computer as you would do it in a windows environment, the log files are sent by remote computers to a central log repository. This way of managing log files has become the standard for Linux / Unix environments. As our IT systems tends to become hybrids, the questions arises how it possible to send syslog messages from a windows computer. In this post I will present you a simple approach.
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PowerShell – Logging in CMTrace format

CMTrace is probably the first choice for a log viewer in a Microsoft environment. When working with System Center Configuration Manager there aren’t any alternatives available. In a recent scenario I had to write log files in the CMtrace format. There are already many cmdlets available to do so, however, most of them did not work well or were overengineered. There I’ve taken a look at the CMTrace format specs and wrote a PowerShell function to create compatible log files.
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Configuration Manager – Configure requirement rules for deployment types with PowerShell

Configuration Manager applications can be equipped with powerful requirement rules. For example an application must be installed only if there is enough disk space on the target device or only if the device is the users primary device. The second example is an important requirement rule when working with user device affinity. Configuring this kind of rule is done in a few seconds using the management console. However, scripting the rule with PowerShell is much more difficult. As of today the cmdlets provided by Microsoft for automating Configuration Manager assets do not support building requirement rules for deployment types. But as always there is a workaround. In my case I’ve decided to create an application template containing all requirement rules and copy specific rules from there to other applications.
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Manage the life cycle of your SCCM applicatons with PowerShell – Part 3 Deploy Applications

“Manage the life cycle of your SCCM applications with PowerShell” is a short post series where I share my PowerShell experience with System Center Configuration Manager. In my last post I’ve shown you a script that creates applications and all assets required to deploy it. This time I have a script to distribute the application content and deploy the application to its collections.
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Manage the life cycle of your SCCM applicatons with PowerShell – Part 2 Create Applications

“Manage the life cycle of your SCCM applications with PowerShell” is a short post series where I share my PowerShell experience with System Center Configuration Manager. In my last post I’ve showed you a script that creates the package source folder structure and another that adds the service users for SCCM. As mentioned these scripts have only been published for a better understanding of the follow-up scripts.
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Manage the life cycle of your SCCM applicatons with PowerShell – Part 1 Service Accounts and Package Source

I’m currently planning and building a System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) infrastructure for a local hospital. SCCM is a complex system composed of various components to make the client and software life cycle management feasible. While configuring SCCM is a tedious job which is done once, managing applications is a recurring process. That’s why the application life cycle is the perfect candidate for scripted automation. With the most recent SCCM release Microsoft made it a lot easier to use the power of PowerShell. I’ve developed a few scripts which help creating, deploying and deleting SCCM applications. Configuring applications manually can be very bothersome and is always at risk for misconfiguration. The benefit for automation is huge.
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XKCD PowerShell password generator

Through 20 ears of effort, we’ve successfully trained everyone to use passwords that are hard for humans to remember, but easy for computers to guess.

If you are a Hacker News binge reader such as me, you might have read this article: The Guy Who Invented Those Annoying Password Rules Now Regrets Wasting Your Time.

This article reminded my of how stupid current password guidelines are and that we need to change that. A few months ago I wrote a random password generator function and decided that it needs an update to make the generated passwords more memorable.
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